Johnson & Johnson Says Its Booster Shot Offers Increased Protection Against COVID: NPR

Johnson & Johnson Says Its Booster Shot Offers Increased Protection Against COVID: NPR


A person receives a dose of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine during a mobile vaccination event held by the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust in Miami, Florida, the United States, on Thursday, May 13th.

Eva Marie Uzctegui / Bloomberg via Getty Images


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A person receives a dose of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine during a mobile vaccination event held by the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust in Miami, Florida, the United States, on Thursday, May 13th.

Eva Marie Uzctegui / Bloomberg via Getty Images

According to the latest study results of the pharmaceutical company, people who receive a booster vaccination against COVID-19 from Johnson & Johnson are better protected against the coronavirus over a longer period of time.

Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine was found to protect a total of 66% against moderate and severe illnesses worldwide and 72% against such cases in the US – dose vaccine increased protection against COVID-19 to 94%.

A booster at six months resulted in a 12-fold increase in antibodies.

The company had previously shared evidence from this study that people who received its one-off COVID-19 vaccine could benefit from a booster dose after six months. The information shared on Tuesday was part of the company’s Phase 3 study.

“Our vast field evidence and Phase 3 studies confirm that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine provides strong and long-lasting protection against hospital admissions for COVID-19. In addition, our phase 3 study data further confirm the protection against COVID-19. 19 deaths, “said Mathai Mammen, global head of Janssen Research & Development at Johnson & Johnson, in a statement.

Experts have said coronavirus boosters will be needed in the future as the effectiveness of these vaccines, including the two-dose shots from Pfizer and Moderna, wears off over time. The Johnson & Johnson study data further support that a COVID-19 booster vaccination could go a long way in providing continued protection from the virus.

“Our unique vaccine creates strong immune responses and a long-lasting immune memory. And when a booster of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is given, the level of protection against COVID-19 increases further, ”Mammen said.

Pfizer’s own data shows that booster vaccinations can restore the effectiveness of your vaccine to 95%. A third dose of the Moderna vaccine, given six months after the first two doses, also boosts immunity significantly, according to the company.

Despite President Biden’s earlier announcement that the US is planning a booster vaccination in the arms of already vaccinated Americans, it is unclear when health officials would approve such a move for the general public.

Health officials have already recommended a third shot of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine for a more limited population – people with moderate to severe immunodeficiency. But last week the Food and Drug Administration recommended allowing a booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for people 16 years and older.

However, this judgment did not affect a Johnson & Johnson booster vaccination.

The company says it has made available data available to the FDA and plans to share the data with other regulatory agencies, the World Health Organization, and national immunization technical advisory groups around the world to aid decision-making on vaccine administration strategies.

Johnson & Johnson results indicate increased protection

Data from the Johnson & Johnson booster study showed strong protection against severe COVID-19 infections shortly after the second dose was administered.

At least 28 days after a patient received the second injection from Johnson & Johnson, the data showed an overall effectiveness of at least 75% against severe or critical COVID-19 infections in all age cohorts and in all countries participating in the study.

Doses of the Johnson & Johnson Janssen Covid-19 vaccine are seen in a vaccination clinic during an Atlanta Braves baseball game at Truist Park in Atlanta, Georgia, the United States, on Friday May 7, 2021. The Atlanta Braves will be giving free COVID-19 vaccinations to fans during their Friday and Saturday games against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Elijah Nouvelage / Bloomberg via Getty Images


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Doses of the Johnson & Johnson Janssen Covid-19 vaccine are seen in a vaccination clinic during an Atlanta Braves baseball game at Truist Park in Atlanta, Georgia, the United States, on Friday May 7, 2021. The Atlanta Braves will be giving free COVID-19 vaccinations to fans during their Friday and Saturday games against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Elijah Nouvelage / Bloomberg via Getty Images

For the USA specifically, the company reported an effectiveness of 74% against critical COVID-19 infections. The booster also offered 89% effectiveness against hospital stays and 83% against COVID-19-related deaths.

A booster vaccination after two months showed 94% effectiveness against COVID-19 in the US. According to the company, the data showed 100% effectiveness against critical COVID-19 infections just two weeks after the booster was given.

When a booster shot of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine was given six months after the single dose, antibody levels rose nine-fold one week after the booster and continued to rise twelve-fold four weeks after the booster.



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Rachel Meadows

Rachel Meadows

Trending topics news writer who enjoys cooking, walking her dog and travel.

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