CDC Reduces Recommended Isolation and Quarantine Time After Coronavirus Exposure: Coronavirus Updates: NPR

CDC Reduces Recommended Isolation and Quarantine Time After Coronavirus Exposure: Coronavirus Updates: NPR


A medical worker conducts a coronavirus test at a new testing location in the Times Square subway station in New York City on Monday.

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A medical worker conducts a coronavirus test at a new testing location in the Times Square subway station in New York City on Monday.

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People who test positive for the coronavirus only need to isolate themselves for five days if they don’t show symptoms, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Monday. This halves the previous recommendation of 10 days of isolation.

The data shows that the majority of coronavirus transmissions “occur early in the disease,” the CDC said – generally a day or two before symptoms start and two or three days after.

“Therefore, people who test positive should isolate themselves for 5 days, and if they are asymptomatic at this point, they can exit isolation if they can continue to mask for 5 days to minimize the risk of infecting others” the CDC said in a statement.

The CDC has also updated their recommended quarantine time for people exposed to the virus. It stated that unvaccinated people should be quarantined for five days, followed by five days of “strict mask use”. Exposed individuals who are more than six months after their second dose of the Pfizer BioNTech or Moderna vaccine or two months after a Johnson & Johnson vaccine should also be quarantined for five days.

Individuals who received their booster vaccination do not need to be quarantined after exposure, but should wear a mask for the next 10 days.

Alejandro Brown receives a COVID-19 vaccine from a healthcare worker at a drive-through location in Miami on December 16.

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Alejandro Brown receives a COVID-19 vaccine from a healthcare worker at a drive-through location in Miami on December 16.

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“The Omicron variant is spreading rapidly and has the potential to affect all facets of our society,” said CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, in a statement. “The CDC’s updated recommendations for isolation and quarantine balance our knowledge of the spread of the virus and protection from vaccinations and booster doses. These updates ensure that people can safely continue their daily lives. “

Dr. Megan Ranney, Assistant Dean of the School of Public Health at Brown University, Tweeted Monday that a major reason the federal government changed isolation requirements is the economic burden of full quarantine.

“Our economy will shut down when everyone needs to be isolated for 10 days. Fortunately, science is at least partially backing the move, ”she tweeted. “On the one hand: I am in favor of following the science for the vaccinated & asymptomatic. No reason to keep people at home unnecessarily.”

Kudos to the CDC, “for realizing that our knowledge has changed – and the virus has changed,” especially for those who were vaccinated.

Ranney said what would make that decision even safer would be to request a quick test before ending the isolation.

The CDC does not currently require this step, and quick home COVID tests have been difficult to come by during the Omicron surge.

The Biden government, under pressure not to increase the widespread availability of home tests, last week rolled out a plan to set up federal tests across the country. The government will also buy and ship half a billion COVID test kits at home. But deliveries won’t start until January.

The new guidelines come days after the CDC relaxed rules on how long health workers should isolate from 10 to seven days after being infected with the coronavirus. In the event of staff shortages, the isolation time could be further shortened.

The next day, New York officials followed suit, reducing the number of days health workers had to isolate to five after testing positive for coronavirus. On MediaFrolics Morning edition on On Monday, Dr. Anthony Fauci made the move.

Five days of quarantine should be enough for healthcare workers, Fauci said, adding, “This is being considered whether we want to reduce it or not” for the general public.

In the US, as of Monday, 242 million people had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, 205 million were fully vaccinated and 66 million had received a booster vaccine, according to the CDC’s COVID Data Tracker.





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Rachel Meadows

Rachel Meadows

Trending topics news writer who enjoys cooking, walking her dog and travel.

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