CDC advisors support wider use of COVID vaccine boosters: shots

CDC advisors support wider use of COVID vaccine boosters: shots


Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administered a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster that was shot in the arm of Norman Solomon in October in San Rafael, California.

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images


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Safeway pharmacist Shahrzad Khoobyari administered a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster that was shot in the arm of Norman Solomon in October in San Rafael, California.

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

A panel of experts advising the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supported the expansion of Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine boosters to all adults.

The experts met on Friday afternoon, just hours after the Food and Drug Administration approved the boosters for people aged 18 and over.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has voted in favor of a change in COVID-19 vaccination policy, which says that people 50 and older should receive a booster vaccination if they have had a primary series of an mRNA vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer) at least six months previously. The recommendation also applies to people aged 18 and over in long-term care facilities.

For those aged 18 or under and under 50, the panel endorsed a policy that says they can get a refresher based on individual risks and benefits.

An analysis by a CDC working group concluded that the risk-benefit ratio of a booster vaccination is clearest in the elderly. The group also noted that the latest data on myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart that is rare after vaccination but most common in young men, remains “comforting to this day”.

The next step is for CDC director Rochelle Walensky to make a statement on the committee’s recommendations and provide an official position from the health authority.

The director generally endorses the panel’s recommendations, but overrides aspects of the September committee’s decision on Pfizer’s first a in one rare deviation.



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Rachel Meadows

Rachel Meadows

Trending topics news writer who enjoys cooking, walking her dog and travel.

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