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Gucci Teams Up With The North Face


paris, france october 02 a guest is seen attending hermes during paris fashion week wearing the north face on october 2, 2017 in paris, france photo by matthew sperzelgetty images

Matthew SperzelGetty Images

Despite announcing its departure from a traditional fashion show calendar, Gucci is still making headlines in the middle of fashion month. With a short video clip posted to Instagram and TikTok, the Italian house has announced that a collaboration with The North Face is underway. The teaser features both brands’ logos on a flag pitched on a summit. Let the literal and figurative foghorn sound, because this is a collaboration we didn’t know we needed.

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While The North Face is familiar with high fashion partnerships—they’ve previously worked with Supreme, Sacai and MM6 Margiela, to name a few—this marks Gucci’s first collab under Alessandro Michele’s tenure. Gucci has taken on its own variation of hiking boots in the past, so it only makes sense for them to pull directly from the source with the outdoor brand. It’s peak gorpcore, alps-related pun intended.

The North Face is known for its lifelong efforts in reducing its carbon footprint, so this alliance falls in line with Gucci’s recent steps toward a cleaner future. In June, Gucci launched Off the Grid, its first sustainable collection made with recycled, organic, and bio-based materials. It’s also a part of Circular Lines, the brand’s ongoing mission to create a circular production line that decreases the amount of waste introduced into the ecosystem by reimplementing it back into their supply chain.

Details about what this collaboration looks like or when it drops is still unknown, but Gucci’s rep stated that “Gucci and The North Face confirm that they will be bringing a collaboration to life in the coming months that celebrates the rich heritage of both brands.”

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What to Do If You Decide to Get Off Hormonal Birth Control


As adults, we often have to make decisions that ultimately sacrifice a personal want. For instance, we want to stay up and finish binging Selling Sunset, but we must turn off the tele for a decent night’s sleep.

On a more serious note, we may want clear skin, but hindering a potential pregnancy often takes precedent. If you’re on birth control, you’ve heard about or maybe even experienced acne as a side effect of taking hormones on a daily basis. You also gamble with flare-ups when you decide to remove contraception altogether. Oftentimes, it feels like we must be plagued with one issue in order to solve another. But, if you’ve decided it’s time to try for a baby, or you just want to give your body a hormonal break, expect a 6-12 month transition for your body after getting off contraception like the pill or an IUD.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 22.9% of women ages 15-49 are on birth control via the pill, IUDs or injections. Birth control has been prescribed for a variety of reasons outside of its intended use (to prevent pregnancy): to regulate heavy menstrual bleeding and disorders like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and to help with acne.

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More and more doctors and dermatologists are prescribing the pill specifically for hormonal breakouts. “It’s one of the most common things in dermatology that we’re prescribing right now, especially to teenagers and people in their early 20s to treat their acne,” explains Dr. Nancy Samolitis, board-certified dermatologist and co-founder of Facile Dermatology + Boutique in Los Angeles. “We’re trying to avoid using antibiotics, which used to be the gold standard (in acne reduction). Unfortunately, when you take antibiotics you have to be on them for a very long time. Our other option is Accutane. Accutane is a great drug and it works, but not everybody is a candidate,” she said.

Birth control can be an agent for breakouts or can be used to solve them; this is pretty common knowledge among users. However, one side effect of hormonal contraception that I wasn’t privy to when I first got on it was hyperpigmentation. I was taking the pill (Yaz, which contains both estrogen and progesterone) for several years before I was informed by esthetician Renée Rouleau that I had melasma. The dark spots I had on my face, present on my forehead, cheeks, and a little on my upper lip, were in fact not remnants of self-tanner I hadn’t scrubbed off. (To be young and naive.) It was hyperpigmentation resulting from the hormones I was taking from oral contraception.

When I decided to get off Yaz, one of the welcomed byproducts was that my melasma almost disappeared. With a few laser facials and the use of hydroquinone, an ingredient that lightens the skin, one would be hard pressed to discover I ever experienced it. But another part of the aftermath was that my skin broke out.

Making sure I am in control of my body is a priority — even as a diehard skin care junkie. Getting off the pill was a smart decision for me at the time, and one I was privileged to make without worrying about health issues. Getting an IUD four years later was also the intelligent thing to do, as I started a new relationship. But as I start to think about the future, like many women, I’ve been considering how long being on hormonal birth control is too long, and what will happen to both my body and my skin once I decide to give it up, for whatever reason that may be.

Your Body

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Our body has to adapt to receiving the hormones that will stimulate ovulation again. “Most hormonal contraception interferes with the signals sent from the pituitary gland (brain) to prevent ovulation, or release of an egg from the ovaries each month,” said Dr. Lucky Sekhon, Board certified OBGYN, Reproductive Endocrinologist and Infertility Specialist.

“When stopping these hormones, it can sometimes take the brain a few cycles to ‘wake up’ and begin to pump out the necessary hormones that stimulate the ovaries and drive the process of ovulation,” said Sekhon. Once ovulation normalizes, you will experience your period again (if you were taking a pill to continuously skip your period) and will experience symptoms like premenstrual syndrome which includes “heightened depression/anxiety in the week leading up to menstruation, breast soreness after ovulation, an increase in cervical mucus around the time of ovulation, and skin changes such as acne leading up to menstruation,” according to Dr. Sekhon.

Your Skin

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And what can we expect from our skin when we decide to get off birth control?

Mostly, experts acknowledge your skin might break out for an extended period of time, but it’s crucial to think about what your skin was like when you first got on contraception. Just as the body adapts to receiving hormones that will stimulate the ovaries and begin the process of ovulation again, you should expect that any skin issues you might have dealt with before your were on hormonal contraception to return. Dr. Sekhon says you may experience what she refers to as “rebound acne.”

“Some women take birth control pills containing a special form of progesterone, which works to prevent acne by controlling the effects of testosterone on skin. When stopping this, they may experience ‘rebound acne’,” said Dr. Sekhon.

Renée Rouleau, esthetician and founder of her eponymous skin care line, mimics this sentiment. “Many people go on birth control pills in an attempt to lessen breakout activity due to their bodies fluctuating hormones. There are fluctuations in androgen hormone levels right before and during a woman’s period that can stimulate sebaceous glands to produce excess oil,” said Rouleau. “Since oil encourages bacteria, along with dead cells in the pore lining, this can cause breakouts to occur. The pill can help reduce breakouts due to their effect on natural hormonal balance. However, when they go off of it, their body may return back to the way it was and breakouts can slowly start to appear,” she said.

She clarifies that timing is key. If you went on the pill as a teen or to deal with adult acne, you may be in the clear if it’s been a few years. “Depending on how long someone has been on the pill, they may have outgrown the hormonal fluctuations so they very well may find that going off the pill does not make their breakouts return. It just varies by individual,” she said.

When it comes to IUDs, if you experience acne after getting it inserted, you may actually benefit from the removal.

“Hormonal IUDs may trigger acne for some women because they release progestin, an artificial form of the hormone progesterone, into the body,” said Rouleau. When progesterone levels are increased, androgenic hormones — like testosterone — can also increase in a woman’s body. Androgens cause acne by overstimulating oil glands. “By removing the IUD, you may experience fewer breakouts if you think your IUD may be the cause,” she said.

Additionally, melasma is often called the “mask of pregnancy” because many women experience it for the first time when they’re carrying, due to the influx of hormones. Same can be said for getting on birth control.

“When women are on the pill, a common side effect is to develop hyperpigmentation (brown patches) often above the upper lip, cheeks and forehead,” said Rouleau. “Going off the pill will allow that to fade and with the intervention of professional treatments such as peels, it can be fairly easy to get rid of.”

How to Prepare Yourself For Getting Off Hormonal Birth Control

To prepare yourself, expect a 6-12 month transition for your body after getting off contraception like the pill or an IUD. Dr. Sekhon advises it may take 3-6 months for your body to recover, especially if you’re trying to conceive. If you haven’t had your period after 6 months, she recommends getting an evaluation by a doctor to ensure there aren’t any further ovulation issues.

For your skin, Dr. Samolitis explained it can also take several months to a year for your skin to get back to normal, which is where topical medications come into play.

“If they want to do non-medical intervention, we have topical medications — like a prescription called Aczone,” she said. Ingredients like benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin, which are often used for teenage acne and can be irritating to the skin, do not work well for adult acne in women, according to Samolitis. “Aczone doesn’t have all those side effects. And it seems to work better for the purely inflammatory acne.”

She also suggests over the counter topicals like Niacinamide — an ingredient we’re seeing more and more of. “This is something that’s cheap that you can buy at CVS or on Amazon — 500mg twice a day. As a bonus, it also reduces your risk of skin cancer.”

The Ordinary Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1%

The Ordinary
ulta.com

$5.90

Rouleau suggests creating an environment for the skin where breakouts are less likely to occur by using gentle, non-drying products with an anti-microbial effect to allow less bacteria on the skin’s surface and within the pore.

“You can also introduce a product that addresses the microbiome,” said Rouleau. “A product with prebiotics can be very helpful to add into a skincare routine. Simply put, prebiotics encourage our skin to produce more ‘good’ bacteria that can help balance the skin and fight acne.” She suggests products from her Rapid Response line, including the Detox Masque and Toner.

Outside of a consistent-yet-gentle skin care routine and prescription options, it’s important to cut possible dietary triggers. Cut high glycemic, processed foods that may spike your insulin and can cause acne, as well as dairy — although Dr. Samolitis says that isn’t the case for everyone. Options like regular facials can help with clogged pores, and red light can deliver results for inflammation. If you’re looking to conceive and are dealing with breakouts, a new option on the market is Sebacia, an alternative to drugs like Accutane. It targets the oil gland and can help clear acne after three treatments without the harsh side effects. Samolitis offers the treatment at Facile.

Together, these can help alleviate post-BC skin issues a little while your body recuperates, but ultimately time is your friend.

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Jordan Daniels Isn’t Going Anywhere


jordan daniels

Bustier bodysuit, belt, leggings, earrings, bracelet, handbags, slingbacks, all Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello.

Matthew Kristall

Jordan Daniels is on the ferry when we speak, the tooting of tugboats and sound of rushing water punctuating our conversation. Doing an interview while in transit seems appropriate for the model, who has spent her life moving between continents. Born in South Africa, Daniels grew up in New Zealand, where she enrolled in college and took a retail job. It was “a normal life,” she recalls. Then she upended that normalcy, jettisoning her studies to head to L.A. in hopes of taking her modeling career to the next level. “I didn’t ask my parents for permission or anything—I just did it,” she says.

jordan daniels

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Jacket, belt, Tod’s. Gown, Erdem.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Dress, Oscar de la Renta. Earrings, Bulgari. Boots, Proenza Schouler.

Matthew Kristall

The risk paid off. After she notched an exclusive booking for Prada’s spring 2019 show, Daniels has since walked a marathon’s worth of runways, from Dior to Marc Jacobs to Thom Browne. All that travel helped spur an interest in international cuisine. “It was one of the ways that I would get to know a city,” she says. Her dream is to have her own Anthony Bourdain–style travel show someday, focused on food and culture.

jordan daniels

Dress, belt, Etro. Earrings, pumps, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello. Ring, Dries Van Noten.

Matthew Kristall

In self-isolation, Daniels has been getting creative with remote shoots. “I’ve glued crystals on my teeth,” she says, and incorporated her dogs and cats into the background of her shots.

jordan daniels

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Tank, skirt, Salvatore Ferragamo. Earrings, ring, Bulgari.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Matthew Kristall

She’s been staying politically engaged, working with Starfish Greathearts Foundation, which supports children in HIV/AIDS-affected communities in South Africa, and she’s been active in the Black Lives Matter movement, helping to provide supplies to protesters. And she’s given thought to how the fashion industry can be more inclusive when it comes to Black models like herself. To Daniels, that means investing in their careers long-term. “At the end of the day, new faces are, unfortunately, disposable,” she says. “It’s all about longevity.”

jordan daniels

Blouse, pants, Ralph Lauren Collection. Gloves, $350.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Dress, Alberta Ferretti.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Skirt, shorts, earrings (worn in hair), necklace, handbags, all Chanel.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Jacket, Bermuda tuxedo shorts, blouse, bow tie, clutch, all Celine by Hedi Slimane.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Dress, bra, brief, Dolce & Gabbana.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Top, Max Mara. Bralette, panty, Love Stories. Boots, Halpern x Christian Louboutin.

Matthew Kristall

jordan daniels

Top, tights, bracelet, handbags, pumps, Prada.

Matthew Kristall

Hair by Nicole Nelms; Makeup by Chao-Li for Chanel; Produced by Hillary Foxweldon.

This story appears in the September 2020 issue.

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30 Genius Beauty Hacks the Royals Use to Look Flawless


Don’t be afraid of a big haircut.

Diana, Princess of Wales had long worn a poofy ’80s ‘do, but a meeting with celebrity hair stylist Sam McKnight and a leap of faith inspired that chic pixie cut. “Like many women, she used to hide behind her hair,” he told the Daily Telegraph. “She said, ‘what would you do if I gave you free reign?’ I said, ‘cut it short,’ and she said, could you do it now?’”



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Pamella Roland RTW Spring 2021 – WWD


@Dior has launched a campaign to promote the education and empowerment of women and youth, in partnership with the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project, or CTAOP.⁣

In an exclusive interview with WWD, Theron discusses CTAOP’s history, her evolving partnership with Dior, the latest on her upcoming TV and film projects — including the “Atomic Blonde” sequel — and her thoughts on COVID-19’s impact on Hollywood.⁣

“This educational program is aimed at helping the budding leaders of tomorrow, who are more often than not young girls. By covering full study costs for the entire 2021 year cohort, Dior Perfumes is walking this journey with CTAOP to invest in a better future. Together, we will be able to help these exceptional young people spread their wings, and I can’t wait to see what they do. It is a source of immense pride and great hope for the future that we share, together.”⁣

Tap the link in bio to read the full interview. ⁣

Report: @ryma___________





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All Emmys 2020 Red Carpet Celebrity Dresses & Looks


The coronavirus pandemic has altered much of awards season, and the Emmy Awards tonight is no exception. But even though the show is being conducted virtually, with celebs accepting their honors at home to avoid the risk of spreading COVID-19, the stars still dressed up. From glam jammies to gowns worthy of the red carpet, here are all their looks from the night.



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LBV RTW Spring 2021



With the majority of the world under quarantine, LBV’s Elizabeth Kennedy designed this collection for the women who are ready to take the world by storm again, wearing floor-length gowns. Kennedy was inspired by the idea of Seventies sci-fi futuristic and drew influences from the desert’s natural palette of lilac pink, orange, ivory, gold, tan and metallic silver. A few standout pieces were a spectacular dress made from strips of raffia woven with silver beading and the bold and strong zebra-printed haircalf coat that was made to hug the body in all the right places.

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Survey Reveals Retail Operational Hurdles, Need For Training – WWD


In a survey of retail and hospitality industry decision-makers, Multimedia Plus found executives having to revise operational plans after they reopened doors following a relaxation of COVID-19-forced restrictions this summer.

The training and communications technology company also said respondents cited leadership development and training on a variety of topics as top priorities for next year.

“Executives in retail and hospitality are challenged to keep up with operational procedures based on the number of COVID-19 outbreaks, the mandates of state and local government requirements and based on the needs of staff and guests,” the company said in a statement. “The number of adjustments is still in flux and is being updated on an ongoing basis.”

The survey found that 78 percent of respondents “said that they have revised operational procedures since reopening three or more times” while 11 percent said revisions were done twice and 4 percent said just once.

When asked about health screenings, the results of the survey showed that 50 percent of respondents were using only a verbal acknowledgment company-wide. And while checks “are being implemented in various ways, only 30 percent are tracking digitally,” the report noted.

With pre-shift employee health screening, 50 percent used verbal acknowledgment while 25 percent used signatures and 25 percent used a digital acknowledgment. Just 5 percent had an electronic display pass in use.

David Harouche, chief executive officer and founder of Multimedia Plus, said the survey showed that there is an opportunity for leveraging technology as part of adjusting to a “new normal.”

David Harouche

David Harouche 
Courtesy image.

“In order to keep up with the pace of changes, retailers and hospitality executives are using mobile technology and maximizing those resources to incorporate changes in operational procedures,” he explained. “The acknowledgment of pre-shift employee health screening via employee mobile devices is just beginning as managing daily checks of thousands of employees is still a manual process for most organizations.”

Harouche said companies that have “robust mobile training and communication platforms in place have been better equipped to reopen with smoother transitions. We see this trend continuing as teams across the United States need to be flexible and agile.”

Other findings of the report showed that diversity and inclusion training is a top priority as well as leadership development and safety training. New operations and product knowledge training also ranked high.

 





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The Most Surreal Moments From New York Fashion Week


new york, new york september 13 a model walks the runway for jason wu september 2020 during new york fashion week the shows at spring studios terrace on september 13, 2020 in new york city photo by mike coppolagetty images for nyfw the shows

Mike CoppolaGetty Images

While some New York designers opted out of showing during the spring/summer 2021 season—including industry heavy hitters like Michael Kors, Marc Jacobs, and more—others persevered. NYFW’s digital stage saw many interpretations, but a few moments felt as chaotic as trying to find your seat at an IRL runway show. It begs the question: must the show go on? For the following designers, it did. From designer Segways to socially distanced catwalks, read on for the wildest moments that happened this week.

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1

Coco Rocha’s Wet Mask at Christian Siriano

Christian Siriano held an actual runway show at his stately home in Connecticut this season. And while the clothes were lovely as always, chaos ensued when a pregnant Coco Rocha stepped into the pool wearing a ball gown. Her dress weighed down with water and she struggled to climb out, requiring assistance from an onlooker. All in all, it made for really great TikTok content.

2

“An absolute nightmare” with Tom Ford

COVID-19’s impact directly hit Tom Ford, as he explains in a video posted to the brand’s Instagram. With sample rooms and showrooms closed during coronavirus, the company had limited access to not only getting fabric, but working altogether. Seamstresses were sewing at home and it impacted the brand’s workflow. “It was very hard to be creative in that environment,” Ford admits. You wouldn’t be able to tell they struggled though, given the collection’s end result.

3

Jason Wu’s Socially Distanced Runway

Snagging a front row seat is difficult as is, but this season edited down the guest list for the sake of safety. Many designers like Jason Wu opted for a socially distanced runway show, which created an intimate setting (and very surreal wide shots).

4

An Intimate Dinner at Laquan Smith

Outdoor dining meets NYFW with Laquan Smith. Instead of presenting, Smith invited his closest friends and creatives to a brand dinner on a rooftop in Manhattan hosted with musician Lion Babe. To say the dress code was good is an understatement.

5

Lil Nas X, Segways, and Christian Cowan

Designer Christian Cowan joined forces with Lil Nas X and—reads notes—Segway for a spring-summer collection that is all about giving back and showing up. 100% of the profits from this unisex line will benefit Atlanta’s Black queer youth community with the Loveland Foundation, an organization founded by activist and writer Rachel Cargle who also starred in the show. Oh and there were custom scooters, too.

6

Collina Strada: Change is Cute

As the industry pushes forward, Hilary Taymour of Collina Strada utilized her show as a platform to discuss the world’s current climate. Not only was the inclusive casting a welcome change, but she partnered with two artists who directly address Black issues. The digital show was made in collaboration with Sean-Kierre Lyons, whose “By Any Means Necessary” series features Black folklore minstrel and personal experiences, and Alicia Mersy, an artist who specializes in political resistance video.

7

Dystopian Street Style

Street style has long been described as a circus, but this season took it to the next level. For the brave attendees that actually showed up IRL, some went beyond matching masks to their outfits and instead wore Fauci and NASA-approved headgear.

8

Augmented Reality at Khaite

Khaite went beyond the digital format and looked to creating an experience for viewers at home. In addition to their collection, they launched an augmented reality that allows you to fill your own living room with their shoes, because why the hell not?

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5 Black Influencers on How Beauty Brands Can Do Better


The year is 2018. Beyonce delivered one of her most historic performances as the first Black woman to headline a set at Coachella (err, Beychella). Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians premiered to fanfare proving that, contrary to popular belief, films with a leading cast of color have global appeal. Yet even though 2018 was a landmark year for representation in various industries, the beauty industry missed the memo.

At the top of the year, Tarte unveiled its new 15-shade Shape Tape Foundation range, where only two shades were designed for darker complexions, a negligent move given that Fenty Beauty debuted just months before with a revolutionary 40-shade collection that was ultimately dubbed #TheFentyEffect. It Cosmetics, BeautyBlender, and several other brands missed the mark, too. How, in 2018, were Black women still fighting to reform the beauty standards that continually fail to recognize consumers beyond “medium tan,” “warm honey,” and “almond?”

In August 2018, I asked seven Black influencers—Monica Veloz, Ofunne Amaka, Jessie Woo, Tiara Willis, Armanda Tounghui, Shanygne Maurice, and Cydnee Black—the same question I’d been pondering for years: “Why is it still a struggle to find foundation for dark skin?”

“When you walk into these beauty corporations, you’ll most likely see a white-dominated office space so, because there aren’t a lot of black voices at the table, there isn’t anyone to say, ‘Hey, this launch is not okay,’ or ‘You need to do something different because these shades are not diversified,'” Willis, founder of the popular Twitter and Instagram account @MakeupForWOC, told me at the time. Transparency in companies’ hiring process and leadership board is just as important as delivering a diverse shade range.

Now, two years later, the beauty industry is in the midst of a reckoning. Following an outcry from consumers and influencers, a slew of brands began broadening their offerings and campaigns to be more inclusive. But sometimes their efforts verge on the performative: In June 2020, as the nation broke out in protests in response to the senseless killings of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and other acts of violence by police and white supremacists, brands flocked to social media in droves to lend support to the Black community, issuing statements of solidarity and pledges to be more inclusive in the name of being “woke.” There were also many brands who remained mum in the face of social injustice, revealing that if they didn’t care about Black consumers before—both on shelves and in boardrooms—why would they start now?

Uoma Beauty founder Sharon Chuter launched Pull Up for Change in response to the brands’ silence, an initiative demanding that companies come forward with a demographic breakdown of their employees to demonstrate they’re more than just talk. Once a buzzword brands used to hide behind their shortcomings, will inclusivity move beyond trend to become an ongoing movement? I caught up with Willis, Veloz, Amaka, Maurice, and Woo two years after our initial interview to discuss if the beauty industry has been doing its homework, and how much further we have left to go.

Ofunne Amaka (@cocoaswatches)

ofunne amaka

Courtesy

Would you say the beauty industry is still failing people with darker skin tones?

I would say no, it’s not failing us but I feel brand are getting a little bit too comfortable. With everything going on with Black Lives Matter movement, we’re seeing an uprising happening, and within that uprising demanding for basic human rights, we’re also seeing a lot of calls to action for black creators, creators of color. And in that, you’re seeing so many disparities that still happen behind the scenes that haven’t been addressed.

On the surface, yes, we’re getting more foundation shades and better campaigns, so brands have made a lot of progress. But that’s not to say Black people can relax now. No, we have to keep demanding that if you’re going to launch something that has 60 shades, make sure all the shades are available in-store and that people know how to find their shade—that’s one of the areas of the makeup industry that almost never gets talked about, the in-store experience. Retailers will say, “Oh, we can’t have this many shades because of the space,” or “These units don’t sell.” That relationship between the brand and the retailer, and that relationship between the retailer and the consumer needs to be worked on more.

When you put out products for people, you have to realize that there’s actually people on the other end of the buying process that will be introduced to your product for the first time. Having only select shades in stores or not enough deep shades to begin is frustrating. Is that the first impression you want to give?

This call for diversity in beauty extends beyond shade ranges to opportunities for Black creatives, too. As an influencer, what has been your experience trying to obtain opportunities and ensure you’re being paid fairly?

I do all my deals on my own and it’s hard to not get taken advantage of because there isn’t a lot of transparency in terms of what’s the going rate for X, Y, Z type of project. Sometimes, people just don’t want to pay my rates. I have decide to not pursue opportunities from brands that don’t value what I’m doing, or don’t want to pay what I’m worth.

I had a post on Instagram that basically was just alluding to the fact that it “diversity” has to go farther than just posting someone on your Instagram page. Are you paying them? Are you making them feel heard behind the scenes? Do they have a voice? That just goes for employees, too. Because there are sometimes the lone black employee on a team, and they might have an opinion, and it might not be heard, or they might not feel comfortable voicing it. So to answer your question, we’re in a great place with that right now. A lot of people are being offered things that look like opportunities, but they’re often exploitation.

Thankfully, there’s an Instagram page called I think it’s Influencer Pay Gap, and people send anonymous DMs to the Instagram listing their age, race, sexual orientation, and follower count is, and how much they’ve been offered to do a project. Accounts like these are providing some transparency in terms of what people are getting offered and what people are getting paid.

Courtesy

Just Peachy

raine
colouredraine.com

$20.00

What’s your favorite foundation right now?

When I need a foundation that works right away, I’m going for my Urban Decay Stay Naked.

What’s your favorite Black-owned beauty product?

Coloured Raine everything. Coloured Raine has amazing eye shadows, lipsticks, and blushes. Coloured Raine has a lot of good stuff.


Shanygne Maurice (@yagirltoomuch)

shanygne maurice

Courtesy

What changes have you seen in the makeup industry since we last spoke in 2018?

Two years ago, it seemed as if every brand was in a race of who could put out the most foundation shades. And people got lost in the idea that just having a lot of foundation shades means they’ve cracked the code on diversity when, really, if the rest of your brand isn’t consistent then you didn’t do anything meaningful. There are brands that have gotten better since then. But there are some brands who either put out their inclusive shade ranges in the last two years, and didn’tkeep the same energy with concealer, bronzer, contour, etc.

Especially right now in 2020, it seems it’s the year of bronzers and every brand is putting out their own bronzer. I did a video swatching the latest bronzers and a lot of them—between their advertising and what the product actually looks like—there was a disconnect there because the shades didn’t match IRL. It goes to show how genuine some of these brands are, because if you have to Photoshop a color to make it look dark online but ashy or lighter in person, that says a lot about how a brand views us. We’re clearly not important enough for them to put any effort into making products for us.

Is there truly hope for brands to “keep the same energy” or do you feel like the same outdated outlook persists behind these launches?

Well, minimal effort was being put in before this whole “inclusive” wave. Before the Black Lives Matter movement that’s going on right now, it’s always been a thing. But before it became as widely talked about as it is right now, before George Floyd’s death, you could see that the inclusive marketing that some brands were using was already starting to die down. And I’m happy it’s been brought back up again because of the current place that we’re in right now.

You can look on a brand’s Instagram page and scroll back to 2019 and see what maybe one dark skinned person on there, maybe throw in a couple other people of color. But a brand drop 60 foundation shades and deserve a pat on the back? That energy wasn’t being kept until right now. And right now everyone with Pull Up or Shut Up, putting out their business, brands are reaching out to black creators. Even now some people have already said that that energy has started to die down. It’s a matter of if a brand genuinely wants to do better, they’re going to. It will become clearer to see which brands hop on for the moment and then go back because championing diversity is too much work for them.

What’s your advice to the Black consumers who are finding it hard to trust any brands these days?

Write down the names and take screenshots of how brands are responding to the current climate and Pull Up or Shut Up. In a few months, revisit those brands to see if they stayed true to their words, especially since right now, we need 18 new releases. So it really puts these brands in a competitive place where they’re going to have to put your money where your mouth is, because if brand A and brand B release something, but brand B does better, then brand B is probably going to get that person’s purchase. Spend your money on brands that support you year-round, not just for the moment.

Double Take Contour Stick

What is your favorite foundation now?

NYX Born to Glow, and it’s only $10.

What’s your favorite Black-owned beauty product in your makeup collection?

Uoma Beauty Contour Stick.


Monica Veloz (@monicastylemuse)

monica veloz

Juan Veloz

What do want to see more of from brands moving forward?

Transparency and dialogue. In the past few weeks, there were brands that have called me and said, “Listen, we just want to hear from you and how you’re feeling.” I’m Black and it’s been awful but I’m glad brands are trying to do the work to make Black influencers feel seen and heart. I’m talking huge brands that were like “Listen, whatever it is, whatever concerns you have, whatever you need from us. We’re trying to show our support. How can we show our support?” So I want to see more brands trying to be completely transparent because I only align myself with brands that align with me as a person.

Also, diversity isn’t only a 40-plus shade range. What about the LGBTQ representation? Don’t support the LGBTQ community for just one month and then move on. I’m definitely am seeing a lot more diverse campaigns but it has to be the standard. The current uprising in beauty and the black lives matter movement forced brands to really step up and realize that they need to make a change. I’m sure it scared the hell out of a lot of brands. Good for them.

Courtesy

NARS Natural Radiant Longwear Foundation

As a frequent makeup shopper, where else do you see brands missing the mark?

Undertones. I think a brand came out with 100 shades but where are my undertones? To find your perfect foundation shade, you have to understand undertones. Understanding undertones makes it easier to shop online, especially now that we can’t go in stores and play in makeup or swatch. A foundation range is only as good as the undertones it offers. I’ve played with several different foundations and I still reach for my Fenty Beauty foundation because she understands my undertones. It’s lazy to throw out foundation with limited undertones because not everyone is warm or golden honey or orange. Brands need to get specific with these shade ranges because black women, black people are not just one shape. We’re not as red. We’re made up of a range of beautiful colors and tones that should be reflected in the products we spend our money on.

What’s your favorite foundation right now?

Fenty, obviously. But my other love is my Nars Natural Radiant Longwear foundation.


Tiara Willis (@makeupforwoc)

tiara willis

Courtesy

What has the Pull Up or Shut Up campaign revealed to you about some of the beauty brands you’ve supported?

Basically what we already knew: There’s a real lack of a lack of diversity in the boardrooms of our favorite brands. If there’s lack of diversity, there’s going to be a lack of faith, you’re going to see a lack of ideas and a lack of understanding. If there was a black woman at that board meeting, or a black cosmetic chemist who were in there making those formulas, they would obviously be like, “Oh, I have black family members. I’m black. These shades don’t actually work on us.” And they would actually be that voice to say something.

Anastasia Beverly Hills Luminous Foundation

Anastasia Beverly Hills
sephora.com

$38.00

Diversity in boardrooms is one thing, but where else are brands lacking?

It’s easy for brands to create an extensive range, but they’re not doing the necessary work to actually try it on black skin. Chemists are putting strong green undertones or pink undertones that would normally work for others, but that’s not realistic for darker skin tones. When it comes to bronzers and blushes, and the other steps of makeup, there is a lack there with finding colors that suit dark enough. Think of influencers like Nyma Tang. She had a whole video where she spent hundreds of dollars buying all the bronzes before trying them all and none of them worked for her. It’s 2020. It doesn’t make any sense.

What’s your favorite foundation right now?

Anastasia Luminous foundation.


Jessie Woo (@jessiewoo)

jessie woo

Courtesy

What has the Pull Up or Shut Up campaign revealed to you most about some of the beauty brands you’ve supported?

It’s not enough for the black community that these beauty brands want to expand the shades. We want to see us represented in the offices too. We want to see black people represented on the executive board. Who are decision-makers?, we want to know that you are being inclusive all the way around, not just with your shades. We want to know that black people actually have opportunities within your company. I think that this is what this movement is all about. Black women spend the most money in the beauty world, so if we’re spending the most money we need to be represented. We need to have a say so in what’s going on in these companies.

How has finding your foundation shade become easier?

Finding my shade has become easier because I’m purchasing from black beauty brands more than before. UOMA Beauty, Juvia’s Place, Fenty Beauty, there are a lot of different black owned beauty brands that are coming out and cater to us. Who can speak to our shades better than us? Shopping for my complexion is easier because I’m supporting products made for us, and by us. Just keeping it real. Pro tip: find brands that represents me and you won’t get disappointed.

What’s your general advice to brands that want to do better?

Look around your office then you’ll know where to start. See who’s not there, you know where to start. It’s that simple, really. When brands or companies try to make it seem like it’s so hard, no it’s not. Just look around. Look around. Are there black women here? No. Hire them. Where they at? Be intentional about being “inclusive”. You can’t be inclusive without being intentional. Initiatives like Sharon Chuter’s Pull Up For Change are needed. It’s going to change the hiring process. It’s going to change how these companies look at us. They’re going to have to finally look at us and say, “Okay dang, we really got to listen to these black women. We really have to listen to them because not only do they have these platforms. But then they have these platforms that can influence the buying power.”

What’s your favorite Black-owned beauty product?

I have to give it to Juvia’s Place—their shadows are everything to me. Juvia’s Place show up and they show out. Plain and simple.





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