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Watch Dior’s Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2021 Show From Paris


Dior will debut its haute couture fall-winter 2021 runway show live from Paris on Monday, July 6 at 8:30am EST. Liven up your stay-home plans with a seat at one of the season’s most anticipated (virtual) shows, below.

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How Ban Discrimination Against Natural Hair


Race-based hair discrimination garnered national attention last summer when the CROWN—Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair—Coalition worked to outlaw intolerance based on style, type, and texture. Cofounded by Dove, the National Urban League, Color Of Change, and the Western Center on Law and Poverty, the movement is working to create a “more equitable and inclusive beauty experience for Black women and girls” with a bill that ensures hair traits historically associated with ethnicity are protected at work and at school.

Called the “Crown Act,” it was introduced by California State Senator Holly Mitchell. It’s the first bill in American history to ban hair discrimination, and several states have already passed it.

The CROWN Coalition is officially declaring this July 3 “National CROWN Day” to mark the the 1-year anniversary of the signing of the bill in California. The celebration will feature “a full day of virtual conversations,” according to a press release. People will be encouraged to #PassTheCrown and sign a petition to end hair-based discrimination on thecrownact.com.

The legislation was long overdue. In August 2018, 11-year-old Faith Fennidy left her Louisiana classroom in tears after school officials said her braids violated school policy. Five months later, high school wrestler Andrew Johnson was forced to shave his dreadlocks in public before competing in the 120-pound weight class. That same year in Alabama, Chastity Jones claimed she lost a job offer after refusing to cut her dreadlocks.

These stories, Mitchell told Essence, “were the wind that gave us the opportunity to help challenge public perception, to help us push back on employer perception, to change the law.”

AP/Shutterstock

Last year, Virginia became the fourth state to pass the Crown Act, following California, New York and New Jersey. In a press release, Gov. Ralph Northam said: “If we send children home from school because their hair looks a certain way, or otherwise ban certain hairstyles associated with a particular race—that is discrimination. This is not only unacceptable and wrong, it is not what we stand for in Virginia. This bill will make our Commonwealth more equitable and welcoming for all.”

Several days later, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed the CROWN Act into law.

“When someone chooses to celebrate their natural hair, we should join them in that celebration and not discriminate against them,” Colorado Rep. Leslie Herod, one of the bill’s sponsors, told the Denver Post. “I am just really overwhelmed and appreciative of the outpouring of community support around the CROWN Act.”

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The Crown Act was recognized at the Academy Awards last year during Matthew A. Cherry’s acceptance speech for Hair Love, which picked up an Oscar for best animated short. The film (above) follows a Black father as he learns how to do his daughter’s hair. Cherry’s guest that evening was DeAndre Arnold, a high school senior from Texas who was told to cut his dreadlocks—or he couldn’t walk the graduation stage.

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Hair Love was done because we wanted to see more representation in animation,” Cherry said during his acceptance speech. “We wanted to normalize Black hair. There’s a very important issue that’s out there, the CROWN Act, and if we can’t help to get this passed in all 50 states it will help stories like DeAndre Arnold’s who’s our special guest tonight.”

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Dolce & Gabbana Unveils a Virtual Alta Moda Spectacular


For Alta Moda, Dolce & Gabbana’s answer to couture, the destinations—Capri, Sicily, Lake Como—are just as glamorous as the clothes on display. This time around, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana are marking summer, the return of la dolce vita, and their latest Alta Moda, Alta Sartoria, and Alta Gioielleria collections in a big way (albeit virtually). Via a private site for Dolce & Gabbana’s coterie of clients, the Italian house is showcasing all three collections. The site includes a video with an old-school slide show featuring snapshots of the Duomo in Milan and gondolas in Venice, harking back to the golden era of international travel. (Remember international travel?)

dolce gabbana alta moda

Dolce & Gabbana

dolce gabbana alta moda

Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda

Monica Feudi

Though there was no celeb-filled front row, the duo still brought the glamour with a collection inspired by Italian razzle-dazzle and travel and set in the house’s glamorous Milanese salon. Looking to everything from vintage postcards to inspire silk prints and trimming dramatic caftans and kimonos with no shortage of fur and feathers, it was a collection worthy of a Slim Aarons muse—or an Italian starlet.

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Fenty Skin Launch – Everything We Know About Rihanna’s Skincare Line


The rumors are true. Fenty Skin is coming for your beauty cabinet! After dabbling into skincare with lip balm, lip scrub, and blotting paper, Rihanna announced in the latest issue of British Vogue that she is diving into the skincare game with Fenty Skin―with a launch sooner than you think.

“Skincare, it’s the truth. It either works or it doesn’t. There’s nowhere to hide,” RiRi told the outlet.

Rihanna’s announcement confirms the speculation that the sister brand was in the works after a trademark with the name was filed in March 2019 with the United States Trademark and Patent Office as reported by Page Six.

According to the trademark, Fenty Skin will cover, “medicated and non-medicated skin care preparations and soaps, body care kits comprising non-medicated body care preparations, and skincare product accessories.” It will not include “color cosmetics, perfume, and other fragrance-only products.”

Although there is not an official launch date for Fenty Skin, we do have an idea of the first products that will drop. The brand trademarked names for five non-medicated skin preparations in September 2019 and earlier this month. All with the signature clever Fenty Beauty product names.

  • Buff Ryder
  • Instant Reset
  • Fat Water
  • Flash Nap
  • Hydra Vizor

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    When Fenty Beauty launched back in 2017, it changed the game with 40 foundation shades soon becoming the industry gold standard. Rihanna’s beauty line has always championed inclusivity and diversity, so we can only expect the skincare launch to do the same. The only question remains is: What product will you cop first?

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Shop Outdoor Voices Sale July 2020


As someone who has exclusively worn Outdoor Voices’ TechSweat leggings for months, I have zero shame in admitting I check the website regularly for sales. (I mean, you really can’t have too many pairs of leggings.) The day I’ve been waiting for is finally here: Right now, the retailer is taking up to 50 percent off select pieces in its OV Extra section. Outdoor Voices makes activewear that’s comfortable enough to wearing during virtual workouts and, you know, Netflix sessions. So, if you want to stock up on cozy clothes, now’s the time to fill your e-cart. But hurry! Sizes are running out fast. Peruse through the top styles below, stat.

1

Soccer Longsleeve T-Shirt

Outdoor Voices

$45
$27

You don’t have to be the next Megan Rapinoe to love this soccer-themed shirt. Made out of comfortable cotton, this is one of those shirts you’ll want to wear for multiple days in a row. (No judging, we’ve all been there.)

2

Steeplechase Bra

Outdoor Voices

$45
$36

Wearing a real bra is out of the question these days. Fortunately, the Steeplechase Bra will give you a little support without sacrificing comfort.

3

Outdoor Voices STV.OV Trench

Outdoor Voices

$195
$125

Take your love for Outdoor Voices outside of the gym (okay, your couch) with this stylish trench. Its baby pink hue is bound to brighten your day.

4

3/4 Flex Leggings

Outdoor Voices

$75
$68

With its super-soft lightweight fabric, this flexible style feels more like a second skin than a pair of leggings. I mean, there’s a reason  why my drawers are filled with these leggings…

5

Springs Legging

Outdoor Voices

$85
$68

Own too many basic black pairs of leggings? Brighten up your rotation with Outdoor Voices’ wildly popular spring leggings. With a colorblocked design and mid-weight compression material, this option bridges the gap between form and function.

6

FrostKnit 7/8 Leggings

Outdoor Voices

$115
$92

This colorful pair of leggings is made out of Outdoor Voice’s insulating FrostKnit material. That way, you can stay warm during a chilly morning run, but won’t overheat the moment you break a sweat. 

7

MiniMesh Longsleeve T-Shirt

Outdoor Voices

$55
$44

Found: A shirt that’s versatile to wearing during an at-home workout and Zoom video chat. It’s decked out in tiny mesh, so it’ll help you keep your cool too. 

8

RecTrek Jacket

Outdoor Voices

$135
$108

Let’s be honest: Exercising in a constricting rain jacket doesn’t sound very comfortable. Thanks to Outdoor Voices’ RecTrek jacket—which is made with a stretchy, water-resistant material—you can stay dry and move freely. 

9

3/4 Warmup Legging

Outdoor Voices

$75
$37

Made with Outdoor Voices’ textured compression, this pair of warmup leggings is designed to hug and sculpt all of your curves. And, with a little bit of spandex, they have just enough stretch for your virtual yoga class.

10

FrostKnit Full-Zip

Outdoor Voices

$125
$100

If you want to get a head start on your cold weather shopping, check out the FrostKnit Full-Zip. This lightweight layer is warm enough to wearing during a chilly outdoor run, plus the built-in thumb holes will keep your hands toasty.

•••

For more stories like this, including celebrity news, beauty and fashion advice, savvy political commentary, and fascinating features, sign up for the Marie Claire newsletter.

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7 LED Masks That Reverse Signs of Aging and Help Treat Acne


A futuristic-looking face mask that’s supposed to kill bacteria, prevent breakouts, and reduce the appearance of aging skin? It seems too good to be true, but LED masks are essential to transforming the skin in ways topical products cannot.

“LED masks work by shining different colors and wavelengths of light rays onto the skin. The blue LED rays target the bacteria that live within the hair follicles and contribute to acne pimples and cysts,” Dr. Ife J Rodney, MD, FAAD, founding director of Eternal Dermatology + Aesthetic, tells ELLE.com. “The red rays suppress redness and inflammation of the skin and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, by stimulating collagen production.”

While they’re mainly used as an add-on treatment when you visit your dermatologist or esthetician, the at-home versions can help to keep your skin in tip-top shape—as long as your consistent. Where in-office treatments use more powerful LED bulbs for an extended amount of time (no more than 20 to 30, Dr. Rodney says), “at-home LED masks are not monitored, so there may be a lack of consistency in the treatments.”

Ahead, the seven best LED masks to try, from Dr. Rodney’s splurge-worthy fave to handheld light therapy devices that target your most stubborn impurities.

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1

For Active Breakouts

LightStim for Acne Kit

LightStim
dermstore.com

$169.00

So it’s that time of the month, and a cluster of breakouts appeared on your face. The LightStim handheld LED treatment can directly target your problem areas. “This handheld device is FDA cleared, comes with its own eye protection, and can be used to treat specific problem areas, like your cheeks or forehead,” Dr. Rodney says. The process is simple: hold the device to the area you want to correct for three minutes, then repeat until you’ve covered all areas. 

2

IG-Worthy

Light-Therapy Golden Facial Treatment Device

MZ Skin
mzskin.com

$625.00

Oh, didn’t you hear? Devouring a plate of carbohydrates while masking is the thing right now. Here’s a fancier version that not only looks luxurious but transforms the skin using five different lights to reverse signs of aging and reduces the appearance of hyperpigmentation. 

3

Budget-Friendly

Pro 7 Color LED Mask

Dermashine
amazon.com

$149.99

$105.97 (29% off)

If you want to experiment with LED masks without breaking the bank, Dermashine’s offering features lights that kill bacteria under the surface, calms skin, reduces fine lines and wrinkles, all for $100.  

Foreo
sephora.com

$199.00

Not your typical LED mask but it functions just the same. The Foreo UFO using hot and cold temperature settings to improve the skin in just 90 seconds. Plus, the pulsating section of the treatment feels like a spa-quality face massage. You’re welcome.  

5

A Fan Favorite

SpectraLite™ Faceware Pro

Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare
sephora.com

$435.00

While most masks used red and blue lights separately, this masks uses 100 LED red lights and 62 LED blue lights at the same time to target all your skin concerns. I also love DRx SpectraLite FaceWare Pro. Plus, it’s FDA-cleared and finishes the treatment in three minutes, which makes it a must-have in Dr. Rodney’s book.

6

For Acne-Prone Skin

Quasar MD Blue

Baby Quasar
dermstore.com

$349.00

The beauty about the Quasar MD Blue is that it can be used all over your body and emits blue light to kill bacteria and stop breakouts dead in its tracks.

7

For Tech Neck

Boost LED Advanced Light Therapy Décolletage Bib

The Light Salon
nordstrom.com

$545.00

This LED treatment uses red light to smooth out the neck and shoulder area because your neck needs love too. 

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Shop Missoma Jewelry Sale July 2020


An affordable jewelry line that happens to be one of Meghan Markle’s favorite brands? Check, check. Since 2008, Missoma has been making beautiful jewelry that you can wear all day, every day. Even better news? The brand is currently taking up to 50 percent off select necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. So, whether you want to dress up your sweats for your next Zoom call or save your pieces for when you’re allowed to be around people again, now’s the time to restock your jewelry box. Shop our favorite styles from the sale, below.

Gold Lucky Charm Chain Bracelet

Missoma

$143
$108

This chunky link bracelet screams retro in all of the right ways. In fact, it looks like something you’d find in your cool aunt’s jewelry box.

Gold Engravable Octa Signet Ring

Missoma

$103
$52

Pro tip: Have your initials etched into this signet ring and it’ll look like a family heirloom.

Gold Pave Celestial Stud Set

Missoma

$127
$64

It’s written in the stars: You need these earrings in your life. This pave set is suitable for both virtual happy hours and that string of postponed weddings. 

Gold Inspire Amulet Necklace

Missoma

$162
$106

Bring some good vibes to 2020 with Missoma’s Amulet necklace. This style features symbols of empowerment, creativity and confidence, which we could all use right about now. 

Silver Lasso Ring

Missoma

$59
$30

Found: A dainty silver ring that strikes a balance between subtle and statement.

Silver Round Bracelet

Missoma

$97
$69

This simple, sleek bracelet can look good with just about anything. If you want to give it a personal touch, Missoma offers complimentary engraving. Go ahead, add your initials or a sweet message.

Rainbow Moonstone Gold Calima Hoops

Missoma

$136
$96

You can never have too many statement earrings. Decked out with small moonstones, this pair will instantly dress up a simple T-shirt and jeans. (Or, more realistically, your sweatpants.)

Silver Short Orb Chain

Missoma

$78
$51

It doesn’t matter if you wear it solo or layer it under a lariat necklace, this orb style chain is poised to become a wardrobe staple. 

Pave Rose Gold Hex Huggies

Missoma

$91
$64

This pair of huggies might be small, but pave detailing makes a big statement. Finished in a subtle rose gold, these earrings are a welcomed break from silver or traditional yellow gold. 

Cosmic Graffiti Pouch

Missoma

$77
$39

Looking for a place to stow your valuables? This pouch is easy to spot in a carry-on or purse and will keep your jewels safe. 

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As a Black Woman I Know Too Much About White Hair


My favorite way to start an argument is by saying, “I find it funny how….” followed by whatever transgression has upset me. So, I find it funny how I, as a Black woman, know so much about White hair. I know it gets greasy if it isn’t washed. I know that ‘the Rachel’ didn’t really work out for everybody. And I know if you are going to wear a “Bump It” you need to tease your hair up from the root. However, my White counterparts know about as close to zero as one can get when it comes to Black hair unless it has been popularized by an influencer, celebrity, fashion show or beauty publication. Funny, right?!

A quick Google search of the word “hair” will disproportionately show all-white results. The Google page populates like a Trump rally: not a kink or curl in sight. White women’s hair has dominated the conversation with racially charged terms like silky, smooth and straight; hair ideals not always associated with natural Black hair.

The long lustrous manes you see on TV and in mainstream media are usually in shades of blonde, amber and brunette— rarely with a twist out or an afro featured center stage. White beauty in this space is prioritized even down to how it is maintained. While you’ll see a slow motion hair flip or just-stepped-out-of-the-shower “wet look” in a commercial, it’s rare to find an advertisement that shows a Black woman washing her hair in the same way as a White woman. The White beauty standard is reaffirmed with every shampoo and conditioner scenario, presented as something most women do, but only showing White women doing it.

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My unwanted edification started in high school in the completely devoid-of-diversity suburbs of Connecticut. Connecticut is where I learned some of the greatest hair hits for white women, which included but were not limited to: layers, highlights, balayage, the still-wet-and-left-the-house-hair-to-let-it-air-dry-in-public-look, the classic scrunch moment often done with gel or hair spray to give the illusion of a wave—which if done wrong can end up looking like a crunchy curl—the clip-ins so they can tell you about their ‘weave’ and my absolute personal favorite, the-I-just-went-to-the-Caribbean-with-my-family-and-I-got-these-braids-with-beads-on-the-ends, because “Jamaica, Mon!”

PSA: Cornrows and box braids were not invented at a Sandals resort or wherever you spent your family vacation. Moments like these remove the history of Black hair and hairstyles and place it under the white lens. If you are white and the first time you saw cornrows in person was on vacation, you now associate hair braiding as a part of your tourism experience, and a souvenir you can bring back with a sunburn. These moments which may have harmless intent aid in the erasure of the history and culture behind these hairstyles created by Black people.

a sign for braids, a typical service provided for tourists when visiting the caribbean photo by universal educationuniversal images group via getty images

UniversalImagesGroup

The general lack of awareness of White women when it comes to Black hair unlocks a different level of frustration. I remember when I was in my junior year of college and was preparing to study abroad in Seville, Spain. My biggest concern before I left was, “What am I going to do with my hair?” My White college roommate was studying abroad with me and couldn’t understand the level of stress this was causing me. I didn’t have the energy to explain to her that despite how dull her highlights may get or how visible her roots would become, that if she really needed to she would likely be able to find someone to fix her hair, or at the barest of minimums, find someone that would be familiar with the texture of her hair.

I have had countless experiences like this and I have learned that I do not have the time or the tools to explain the nuances of my Black hair without being offended by how much I know about hair that is nothing like my own. Whether it has been by Asking Jeeves or being bombarded by white standards of beauty in my lifetime, it is now clear to me that I have been in AP White Hair, while my white peers had been left back twice in remedial Black Hair 101.

Having spent a lot of time in predominantly white spaces in school and in the workplace I have done some light Google searches on the things being spoken about around me, even if they were as trivial as highlights and lowlights. White people are most comfortable with Black people who make them feel like they are speaking to white people, so the light research feels almost like I am in Duolingo. Knowing this sort of goofy information can unknowingly shift me from being just the “Black girl at work” to “the nice Black girl at work who asked about my keratin.” The necessity of knowing about Black hair has never been made of value because there is no tangible way for white people to benefit from it other than by co-opting it for non-Black hairstyles.

It is unfortunate that there isn’t more widespread knowledge of Black hair given its resilience, strength and versatility. I am biased, but Black hair is beauty and it is power. I think of all of the uniquely Black experiences I have had in my lifetime that are directly related to my hair. Spending countless hours of my life in the hair salon to get my hair pressed, going into the shop expecting to leave looking like Aaliyah and ending up like Shirley Chisholm instead, getting banana curls for church on Easter Sunday, the first time I had to hold down my ear to get ready for a hot comb straight off the stove to get my edges, rifling through the pages of the JET magazines at the beauty shop to find the Black Beauty of the Week, the headache you get after box braids and my first weave. These memories are not ones I have ever expected my non-Black friends to know about, but I am sure if they had some sort of basic understanding of the cultural differences, in the same way I did growing up, I could have probably avoided the following choice comments: “Your hair is so wild,” “You don’t wash your hair every day?!” and the most fun comment of them all, “I like you better with straight hair like mine!”

“Black hair is beauty and it is power.”

This disproportionate understanding of hair has now come full circle. I have seen so many people pledging a commitment to educate themselves on Black culture and history as a means of reconciling the fact that they have lived the entirety of their lives not having to do so. I kindly ask that all of the non-Black folk making this commitment not misconstrue this as an opportunity for you to learn about Black hair and then explain to me how much you know about its history. I do not need you to educate me about me. I need you to learn and understand more about me.

This is an opportunity for you to be more culturally aware of microaggressions that you are a part of when you treat my hair like it’s a science project. However, if you would like extra credit, please know I have been quietly and patiently waiting in the wings to release a very niche brand of pop quizzes inspired by my personal experiences and composed of questions that I would consider to be deep cuts on Black hair and the like. Is two bundles ever enough? (No.) Should I cancel all of my plans if I plan on getting waist length box braids on a Saturday? (100%)

The winner gets the invaluable knowledge that raisins will never be a part of a potato salad recipe that is welcome at any cookout and it is not okay under any circumstances whatsoever to put their hands in another person’s hair.

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Sustainable Sleepwear Brand Talks Antibacterial, Antiviral Fabrics – WWD


In the past, antibacterial and antiviral fabric treatments were merely an “add-on” feature — but according to Dagsmejan, a sustainable Swedish-Swiss sleepwear company, these technologies “have become a must-have” due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Antibacterial fabrics have been around for many years, as they’ve been particularly useful for performance-oriented sportswear, the company said. “Traditionally, [antibacterial technology] has been a finishing applied to the knitted fabric, with the disadvantage that this treatment washed out after 30 to 40 washes and the effect was gone.”

That’s why Dagsmejan — a Swedish word that references the final days of winter, when the warmth of the sunshine melts the snow even when the temperature is still below zero, according to the brand — developed a technology where antibacterial properties are added at the fiber level, creating a more sustainable and permanent solution to preserving these properties over time.

Dagsmejan also uses natural antibacterial materials such as merino wool, explaining that the thin waxy coating of wool fiber, called lanolin, contains fatty acids that inhibit the growth of mold, mildew and bacteria — which ultimately serve to protect a sheep’s skin from infection. “Those natural properties also prevail in the finished garment,” the company said. But antiviral fabrics are a new frontier, the brand noted.

“We have [recently] seen huge demand for our products — sleep is our natural immune booster and people are realizing that investing in sleep is one of the best investments at this time,” said Andreas Lenzhofer, chairman and cofounder of Dagsmejan.

Here, Lenzhofer talks to WWD about the specifics of antibacterial fabrics versus antiviral fabrics, and the future of antiviral materials in fashion.

Dagsmejan’s proprietary fabrics are antibacterial and allow for more time between washings. Image courtesy of Dagsmejan. 

WWD: What will the market for antibacterial and antiviral fabrics in fashion look like moving forward?

Andreas Lenzhofer: First of all, it is important to define the similarities but also the differences between a virus and a bacteria to clarify the purpose of antiviral and antibacterial fabrics.

Bacteria are unicellular organisms. They are living cells that can be either beneficial or harmful to other organisms. Viruses, on the other hand, are considered to be particles that are somewhere between living and nonliving cells. Viruses have to invade the body of a host organism in order to replicate their particles.

A bacterium can survive on its own, inside or outside the body. Most bacteria aren’t harmful. Most viruses are pathogenic.

Therefore, the purpose of antiviral versus antibacterial fabrics are slightly different. Bacteria in a fabric is more of a nuisance rather than a threat as they — in combination with moisture emitted from our body — can start to stink, and the more bacteria live in our clothing, the more annoying this can get, but normally the consequences are not pathogenic. Hence, the main purpose of an antibacterial fabric is to inhibit the growth of bacteria to keep a fabric fresh to wear for many days or nights without the need of washing it daily after wearing.

On the other hand, viruses — needless to say, these days — are more than a nuisance. Hence, the purpose of an antiviral fabric is to inhibit any kind of host cells that a virus has or can invade on the fabric, waiting for a passage to the doors of our body. And given the potentially lethal consequence of a virus, there is a different level of testing and certification needed that a fabric can qualify to be antiviral.

WWD: Do you think consumers will actively seek antiviral fashion?

A.L.: Given the high uncertainty and the potentially lethal consequences of an infection with COVID-19, there is clearly a foreseeable demand for antiviral fabrics. First and foremost, consumers are most interested in protecting masks, and here an antiviral fabric is certainly a great benefit — in particular if the fabric is compliant with international standards such as ISO 20743, and the fashion industry has already started to convert an original medical tool into a fashion statement.

We can also see some new garments claiming to have antiviral properties, and there for sure is a market. While researchers found that the virus can remain on some surfaces for up to 72 hours, so far, evidence suggests that it’s harder to catch the virus from a soft surface (such as fabric) than it is from frequently touched hard surfaces like elevator buttons or door handle.

Image courtesy of Dagsmejan. 

WWD: What about designers? Might they create regular collections with antiviral materials?

A.L.: For sure, designers will create regular collections with antiviral materials, and we see this already happening with masks — almost all premium labels have started to offer some masks as a fashion statement and the use of proven antiviral materials will certainly create additional protection. In the bigger picture, COVID-19 is such a transformative event that this theme will surely be taken up in some collections.

WWD: What trends for antiviral fabrics and fashion can we expect to see in the short term, and in the long term?

A.L.: Compared to [sectors such as] health care and nutrition, fabric manufacturing is still loosely regulated when it comes to labeling requirements and scientific testing of claims. While this somehow accepted in the wider industry and by consumers, despite the often negative ecological consequences or the rare occasion of skin irritations due to the use of harmful substances, this level of nonchalance cannot be accepted when it comes to antiviral fabrics declarations.

While today it is often a “Wild West” with hundreds of brands producing masks or clothing with antiviral claims going unchecked, long-term this situation will not be tolerated and technologies such as Viroblock, newly developed by the Swiss company HeiQ and are tested and certified, will prevail.

WWD: Will COVID-19 forever change fashion and consumer behavior?

A.L.: During the lock-ins, there was a clear change in consumer behavior — why invest in fashion if you cannot go out? On the other hand, consumers shifted discretionary spending to where it matters: personal health, comfort and safety. And it comes as no surprise that in particular categories such as sleepwear, sportswear and home wear have benefited in recent weeks.

The jury is still out on whether this is a long-term trend or just a temporary change. What we at Dagsmejan believe is that people’s focus on personal health and wellbeing will only increase, and product categories supporting this need will prosper.

WWD: How effective are antiviral fabrics, and are they truly protective? 

A.L.: Research published by the American Chemical Society and conducted by University of Chicago scientists suggests that fabric type plays a role in filtration efficiency. Face masks made from one layer of cotton and two layers of silk effectively filtered over 90 percent of particles over 300 nanometers in size. This is still much lower than fabrics used for surgical masks, which are made of non-woven fabric, mainly made of polypropylene, which has better bacteria filtration and air permeability while remaining less slippery than woven cloth.

Antiviral finishing of fabrics can significantly enhance the protectiveness of classic woven or knitted fabrics, but consumers need to be sure that the claims made by the producer are scientifically tested and properly certified.

For more Business news from WWD, see:

Outdoor Brands Talk Coronavirus Impacts

Brick-and-Mortar, Digital Retailers Adjust Strategies in Wake of Coronavirus

Field Notes: How Fabric Is Helping Save the Planet





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