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Former IBM, Google Russia Exec Joins Blockchain Firm Credits as CBO By Cointelegraph



Former IBM, Google Russia Exec Joins Blockchain Firm Credits as CBO

Former Google (NASDAQ:) Russia chief technology officer Jennifer Trelewicz has joined blockchain platform Credits (CS) as its new chief business officer (CBO).

According to an official announcement published on Oct. 11, Trelewicz’s first experience working with blockchain was during her time as the CEO of Russian technology startup S7 TechLab.

Continue Reading on Coin Telegraph

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Decoding Vintage Champagne: When to Buy What


Walking into the Champagne section at a wine store can be both exhilarating and intimidating. Sparkling wine—especially that from the heralded Champagne region in France—evokes celebration and happiness.

But purchasing a bottle of vintage Champagne (wine made from grapes harvested in the same year) and only in years deemed worthy by the winemakers can be wrought with confusion. At any one time, today’s consumer is faced with dozens of brands all featuring different vintages, some from a single plot: Dom Pérignon P2 2002, Krug 2006, Krug 2004 Clos de Mesnil, Salon 2008, Moët & Chandon Grand Vintage 2012, and Louis Roederer 2012—and many, many more.. Even Louis Roederer Cristal has four vintages on the market right now, including the Vinotheque 1996 and Cristal 2009. It doesn’t help that bottles can fetch hundreds, even thousands of dollars.

Louis Roederer Cristal Champagne
Champagne Louis Roederer

How does a consumer choose what to buy?

“The typical consumer still has confusion around Champagne in general, let alone understanding and discerning between vintages,” explains Caleb Ganzer, managing partner of Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels, a wine bar in New York City. “It can be quite hard for sommeliers to keep vintage Champagne straight. The combination of climate change and a bit of zealous brands seeking to capitalize on the ‘prestige’ of vintage Champagne has lead to a great preponderance of the bubbly millésimé (vintage).”

Ganzer refers to the often-confused term “Champagne” for any sparkling wine. In fact, Champagne can only be used for sparkling wine produced in the Champagne region by the traditional method of production; all other sparkling wine is considered simply “sparkling wine.” Within Champagne, there’s non-vintage, the most common type you’ll see on a wine store shelf or restaurant menu. It combines wines produced in multiple years into a relatively consistent house style. Any bottle you pick up—regardless of year—should taste the same.

Krug Champagne
Cerruti + Draime

Then there’s vintage Champagne, a bottle of wine produced from grapes harvested in the designated year. Champagne houses tend not to make a vintage every year. They only produce them in years deemed “vintage” by the winemakers, and follow strict guidelines of production by the overseeing body, the Appellation d’Origine Controlee (AOC). When they release a vintage varies greatly from house to house, because there are no restrictions beyond the mandated aging period of three years. Brands like Krug, Dom Pérignon, and Salon will hold vintages for eight to 11 years, or more, before they release them on the market; smaller producers may release vintages just three years later, the minimum defined by the AOC. At any one time, you’ll see a decade or two span of vintages available.

Read the Label

Brands suggest you read harvest reports and tasting notes on their websites or assume you are an educated wine consumer; you’ll just know what to buy. But that’s oversimplifying the situation—and certainly putting a lot of onus on the consumer’s knowledge. For even the most astute connoisseur, it can be a challenge. Tasting notes start to sound the same after a while, and the intricacies of the weather in a specific year may demand an infographic to make it even remotely digestible. Consumers may hesitate to throw down the credit card, unless they know they are getting the best value for their money. “Consumers only want the best, but vintages are different in style and quality,” says Didier Depond, president of Champagne Houses Salon and Delamotte. “It is always a dilemma for the consumer when they have to select a vintage.”

There are some things to keep in mind, say Depond and other Champagne experts. First off, there is no absolute best. A consumer cannot distill it down into one year being objectively better than another because so many factors are at play.

Champagne Salon
Leif Carlsson

Give It Time

Consumers can, however, rest assured that any vintage they find on the market at their typical wine shop or restaurant list will be ready to drink. Champagne houses tend not to release the wines until they are the optimal drinking window. That means Champagne producers do the hard work of aging the wines, either on the lees (yeast particles left over from the fermentation process that are thought to provide additional flavor in the final wine) and in the bottle for you. Could it age for longer? Yes, but you don’t have to if you want to drink it tonight.

“We keep bottles in the cellars for many years until the winemaking team has decided they are ready to be presented,” says Olivier Krug, the sixth generation head of Krug Champagne, who notes their vintage will usually rest for a decade before hitting the shelves. “If you find a Krug Champagne available that is because it is ready to be enjoyed. You need not worry.”

That’s also why consumers saw the 2009 vintage from Champagne brands like Cristal and Dom Pérignon before their respective 2008 vintages, and Krug’s 2003 before its 2002. The latter needed more time aging before it was ready to drink. Brands may also release a vintage, say 2012, but also save some of the wine for special edition bottles to be released later. That’s how Dom Pérignon’s Plenitude series works. It involves aging the Champagne in eight year sprints. The current release, 2002 P2 stands for a wine that has undergone two aging periods, or 16 years, of the 2002 vintage. For Krug, that’s the recent launch of the 2006, nearly 13 years after harvest.

Age Isn’t Just a Number

It’s enough to make even a sommelier dizzy. It’s easy to see why a consumer will scan the shelf looking for the oldest vintage available, as they’ve been led to falsely believe that’s the best indicator of value. But brands and sommeliers say that older isn’t necessarily better. “People can get hung up on vintages in Champagne in an unfair way,” Ganzer says. “Just because a vintage might seem ‘young’ does not mean it’s not ready to drink.”

Ganzer explains that most consumers would not enjoy a bottle of Champagne from the 1970s as much as they would something from 2016. Older wines often lose freshness, effervescence, and the golden color that’s so beloved by wine drinkers. Plus, there is value in younger vintages—storing wine costs money, and that overhead is passed along to the consumer in the final price. The less time it’s held by the producer, the lower the amount the consumer will pay on the retail end. That’s why smaller producers often release wines after the minimum aging requirement. These are the value picks, says Ganzer, who suggests looking to the Special Club, a group of 28 grower-producers in Champagne, for vintage bottlings that come in lower in price than major houses.

The 2008 Champagne Salon
Leif Carlsson

If a consumer does go for an older wine, it is going to cost them. Xavier Barlier, senior vice president of marketing and communication at Maisons Marques & Domaines USA, the American distributor for Louis Roederer Champagne, says that their customers understand that they are paying up for the older wine. “Vintage Champagne is what I call a ‘destination wine,’” he adds, noting that their Champagnes reach a peak drinking window of 15 to 25 years after harvest. “Consumers know what they are buying. They are willing to pay a premium for our wines.”

You Can Play Favorites—and Play the Field

Familiarity with producers plays an important role in shopping for vintage Champagne as well. Ganzer admits he’d rather drink vintage Champagne from a bad year if it’s a good producer over a great vintage from an average producer. That’s also why houses, like Roederer, always sell out their vintage; they have a host of fans ready to buy the newly released vintage. “Producer should always take precedent over style, quality, or vintage,” he says, adding that it’s a better use of funds to stick to a style you like.

Getting to know producers also requires the fun part: tasting. “A lot goes into making a great Champagne, but personal preferences prevail,” says Niccolo Ragazzoni, vice president of Dom Pérignon. He—like Barlier, Krug, and Ganzer—suggest tasting as much as possible to understand what you like and don’t like. Consumers can do this by purchasing non-vintage bottles from houses because these are often much less expensive than the vintage bottles. They are a strong indicator if you will enjoy the style of the vintage Champagne from the same house.

The 2006 vintage of Krug Champagne
Cerruti + Draime

Barlier recommends talking to sommeliers and wine merchants, too. These professionals have often tasted the wine with the brands and can better explain what to expect from vintages than tasting notes alone. “One of the good things about Champagne houses is they spend a lot of time and money educating buyers,” Ganzer says. Retailers and sommeliers will be well-versed in the differences among houses and vintages.

Consumers should not get hung up on when to drink what they buy either. If you have it, you can open it and enjoy it. Saving it won’t make it better, just different. “Finding the sweet spot of age and flavor and ability to charge a premium for this service do add up to the question that winemakers must consider when harvesting, vinifying, and declaring—or not—a vintage,” Ganzer says. “Typically speaking, a house will not declare a vintage and print it on the label unless they think it’s a worthwhile endeavor.” That means, drink up, whatever vintage it is.

More must-read stories from Fortune:

—Beer City: These women are at the forefront of Asheville’s explosive fermentation industry
—Michelob was really early to this whole marketing ‘beer as wellness’ trend
—Behind the scenes at the largest beer competition in the world
—Why this award-winning champagne maker is turning to sake
—Dom Pérignon looks beyond producing the next vintage and adjusts to the climate crisis
Follow Fortune on Flipboard to stay up-to-date on the latest news and analysis.



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Demand For Apple’s New iPhone 11 Is Strong


Apple has struck gold with the iPhone 11, according to a new report this week. But already, industry watchers are turning their attention to what its plans are for the future.

This week, Wedbush analyst Dan Ives said that demand is stronger than the he had anticipated for the new iPhone 11. He followed that up by saying that Apple plans four new iPhones next year that could all be compatible with ultra-fast 5G wireless networks.

Meanwhile, another report out of China suggested Apple is moving forward with plans to introduce a new pair of wireless earbuds it may call the AirPods Pro. Apple will unveil the earbuds later this month at a press event, according to the report.

But it wasn’t all product news this week. Apple’s problems over a Hong Kong protest app it banned last week also came up. And Apple Pay may come under fire in the European Union over concerns the mobile-payment service is anti-competitive.

Read on for more on those headlines and others in this week’s Apple news roundup:

5G Phones May Be Coming

Apple’s iPhone 11 is more popular than analysts expected, Wedbush analyst Dan Ives reported this week. He said his checks of Apple’s China supply chain suggest the company could sell 185 million iPhone 11s this fiscal year. His comments came alongside his claim that Apple will release four new iPhones next year that will each have 5G connectivity. With that feature, the iPhones will be able to take full advantage of the ultra-high-speed wireless network and offer much faster browsing speeds than current models using older 4G LTE.

What’s Happening With Tencent?

This week, a report said that Apple had been sharing its users’ Web browsing data with Chinese company Tencent. Johns Hopkins University professor Matthew Green had said Apple was making available user IP addresses and browsing histories from its Safari browser to Tencent. Apple quickly responded to the claim, saying that the professor is mistaken. Apple said it’s actually checking the website a person wants to access against Tencent’s database of known malicious or fake websites. When someone in Mainland China requests a website, Apple’s technology quickly bounces the website name off Tencent’s database to see if it’s malicious. If it is, Apple warns users. If it’s not, the person goes to the website. In the U.S., Apple uses the same technology with Google’s database of malicious sites.

Apple’s Hong Kong Response

Just a week after Apple banned the HKmap Live app that gave Hong Kong protesters real-time information about the location of police and potential dangers in their area, Apple CEO Tim Cook met with Chinese regulators this week. According to a Reuters report, Cook discussed with regulators topics including Apple increasing its investment in China to “corporate social responsibility”. Apple didn’t comment about the discussions, but sources told Reuters that Cook’s corporate social responsibility comments may have centered partly on Apple banning the protest app.

AirPods Pro Incoming?

Apple is widely expected to hold a press event at the end of the month, and it may be headlined by a new pair of AirPods, if a recent report is accurate. China-based EDN reported this week that Apple will unveil new wireless earbuds later this month called AirPods Pro. The earbuds will have a revamped in-ear design, noise-canceling features, and cost $250, or nearly $100 more than the $159 first-generation AirPods.

Apple’s Valuable Brand

Apple has the most valuable brand in the world at $234.2 billion, brand consultancy company Interbrand said this week. That was enough for Apple to top Google (brand value $167.7 billion) and Amazon ($125.3 billion). Interbrand’s annual brand-value study assigns a value based on the company’s customer loyalty, ability to attract talent, business growth, and other factors. This is the seventh-consecutive year Apple has had the most valuable brand.

An Eye on Apple Pay

Apple Pay is in the European Union’s crosshairs. MLex, a market insights media company, said this week that the European Union (EU) is seeking comment from mobile payment providers to determine whether Apple is engaging in anti-competitive behavior with its Apple Pay mobile-payments service. The EU’s European Commission investigators are specifically concerned about Apple Pay being the default payment option in Apple’s iOS mobile operating system. In a statement to MLex, a Commission spokesperson said it’s investigating Apple’s “possible anti-competitive market practices and abusive conduct.”

One More Thing…

Apple’s Beats by Dre unveiled new Solo Pro headphones this week. The headphones come with big, cushioned ear cups and work with Apple’s Hey, Siri service for activating the company’s voice assistant. They offer noise cancellation to drown out ambient noise. The headphones, available October 30 for $300, come in several colors including black, gray, blue, and red.

More must-read stories from Fortune:

—The wireless industry needs more airwaves, but it’s going to be costly
—Meet the executive leading Facebook’s big augmented and virtual reality push

—How to claim a cash settlement of up to $358 for Yahoo’s data breaches
—Now hiring: people who can translate data into stories and actions
—Is A.I. a trillion-dollar growth engine or a jobs-killer? There’s reason for optimism
Catch up with Data Sheet, Fortune’s daily digest on the business of tech.



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IMF to examine climate risk to financial markets -official By Reuters




By Megan Davies

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund is examining the impact of climate on the world’s financial markets and whether it is priced into market valuations, the head of the global lender’s markets division said on Saturday.

“We are doing work on the pricing of climate risks and to what extent it is priced into stock and bond markets,” Tobias Adrian, financial counselor and director of the IMF’s monetary and capital markets department, told Reuters. “We are going to look at stock markets country by country, then by sector.”

The financial cost of climate change was the subject of many discussions at the IMF during its fall meetings this week.

“People are more and more aware of this – there’s a certain urge around climate that is new,” Adrian said. “It’s very hopeful that people focus on it, but the reason they focus is that they’re worried. The fact that this really has become a big topic at the IMF speaks for itself.”

Adrian said that to some economies, climate poses a short-term risk, such as in the Bahamas, which was slammed by Hurricane Dorian in September. However, to most economies, the risks are long term.

Some investors have become concerned that climate risk is underpriced in residential mortgage-backed securities, or RMBS, which are pools of home loans sold to investors, with exposure to climate hot spots like Texas and Florida.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Bitcoin Recovers Above $8K After 18th Million Bitcoin Was Mined By Cointelegraph



© Reuters. Bitcoin Recovers Above $8K After 18th Million Bitcoin Was Mined

Saturday, Oct. 19 — crypto markets are seeing a slight recovery after another downward movement as (BTC) is back to trading above $8,000.

After trading below $8,000 threshold for most of the day, Bitcoin has seen a sharp recovery to climb above the mark at publishing time. The biggest cryptocurrency is trading at $8,041, up 1.2% over the past 24 hours, according to Coin360. However, Bitcoin is still in red over the past week as its price is down 3.4% over the past seven days. Bitcoin’s market dominance stands at 66.2% at press time.

Keep track of top crypto markets in real time hereContinue Reading on Coin Telegraph

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Chinese Hacking: The Plane Made from Stolen Tech?—Cyber Saturday


This is the web version of Cyber Saturday, the weekend edition of Fortune’s daily Data Sheet newsletter on the top tech news. To get it delivered daily to your in-box, sign up here.

The C919 airliner, a jet plane under development by the Chinese state-owned aerospace firm Comac, represents an ambitious attempt by China to create a domestic rival to counter foreigners Boeing and Airbus. The sky-faring vessel also appears, in the estimation of the sleuths at hack-investigation firm CrowdStrike, per a new report which supplements earlier federal indictments, to be a beneficiary of rampant intellectual property theft sponsored by the state.

From 2010 to 2015, a sprawling collection of burglars—intelligence officers at China’s Ministry of State Security, underground hackers, security researchers, and corporate moles—is said to have infiltrated overseas suppliers, including GE, Honeywell, France’s Safran, and others. The group’s apparent intention was to steal technologies pertinent to the C919’s development, such as designs for a new turbofan engine and other component parts. It is “highly likely,” the CrowdStrike researchers write, that the makers of a particular Chinese-made engine, the CJ-1000AX, “benefited significantly from the cyber espionage efforts of the MSS”—China’s Ministry of State Security, that is—”knocking several years (and potentially billions of dollars) off of its development time.”

The report is an eye-opening indictment of Beijing’s economic subterfuge. It lays out, in depth, how China “uses a multi-faceted system of forced technology transfer, joint ventures, physical theft of intellectual property from insiders, and cyber-enabled espionage to acquire the information it needs” to leapfrog its peers.

The turbofan engine is just one example of likely trade secret plundering which former U.S. officials have dubbed “the greatest transfer of wealth in history.” Such violations remain a major point of contention between China and the U.S. as on-again, off-again trade talks continue. If any deal is to fly, it’ll have to address all the thievery.

Robert Hackett | @rhhackett | robert.hackett@fortune.com





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5 Things Your Coworkers Don’t Want to Hear You Talk About


“The blended work-life world is here to stay,” declares MetLife’s 2019 annual U.S. employee benefit trends study, “Thriving in the New Work-Life World.” Remote work is ubiquitous, and employees want to feel like they are treated as individuals, with benefits addressing the needs they have in their own lives. And having a workplace “where coworkers feel like friends and family” is one of the top five drivers of happiness, according to the report.  

The combination of close relationships at work and more personal relationships with coworkers and bosses creates a comfortable environment for sharing, says leadership development consultant Jodi Glickman, author of Great on the Job: What to Say, How to Say It, The Secrets of Getting Ahead. Coworkers and supervisors connect on social media and discuss personal issues routinely. And some research suggests that self-disclosure in the workplace builds trust. The problem, says Glickman, is when sharing leads to oversharing. 

In fact, what is shared and who is sharing it make a difference. A January 2018 report published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes found that leaders can ding their reputations if they share information that belies a weakness or personal shortcoming with those who have less status in the office. (Peer-to-peer disclosures didn’t have the same negative effect.) 

“It’s like there is an overshare epidemic, and it’s almost like people are happy to have that release, wherever it may take place,” says Sal Mistry, assistant professor of management at the University of Delaware’s Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics. You have to self-monitor, he says.

Still, there are some things you should just steer clear of because you’ll either irritate your coworkers or change the way they view you, Glickman says. Here are 5 discussions that are a good idea to avoid.

1. Threats to your work

Be careful about disclosing something about your personal life that could lead others to question your ability to do your job or your commitment to it, says Wayne Pernell, PhD, a clinical psychologist and leadership coach. This could take several forms, ranging from positive disclosures, such as a new volunteer, to serious issues like chronic illness or caretaking responsibilities. 

“Context matters a lot,” Pernell says. If you roll into the office on Monday talking about your full weekend and share a bit about your personal life, that’s one thing. If you proceed to use it as an excuse for being tired or not at your best, that’s a problem, he says. He recommends using a rough 5:1 ratio: five positive discussions about your work to each discussion about something that could be seen as taking away time and focus from it.

2. Gross or overly personal details

When people get comfortable with each other, it’s easy to forget where you are and what you should be sharing, Glickman says. It may seem like a blast of the obvious, but less is more when it comes to specifics that could be considered distasteful or off-putting. Generally, it’s best to leave details about your gastrointestinal distress, pet’s latest disgusting habit, and your sex life out of workplace conversations —and it happens more than you might think, she adds.

“It’s the details that people don’t want to know,” Glickman adds. It’s enough to say you’re at home because you’re sick without going into your symptoms. Stop after disclosing that you’re taking a personal day, “instead of explaining that you need to take your 12 cats to the vet,” she adds.

3. Political rants

In large part, the ban on discussion politics or religion has gone out the window. Even current events or policy conversations can devolve into partisan side-taking. But, there’s a difference between having a difference of opinion about how your company should plan for the impact of climate change versus ranting about how you feel about one party or the other, Glickman says. 

By all means, talk about what matters to you. That’s part of being authentic, she says. “You can talk about things you believe in, about how you are working to make the world a better place. But going in and having sort of a bashing Trump conversation, you just have to be careful. I mean, you just don’t know what people think and who’s in the room,” she says.

4. Rumination about personal issues

You may be going through a rough patch, like an illness or a divorce, and sharing the broad details may be appropriate to help people understand challenges that could affect your work from time to time. But be careful about slipping into chronic negativity or self-pity, Pernell says. 

“Trouble happens when either the upset turns to drama and others are drawn in, essentially creating a work slow-down.  It’s troublesome when one person seems to bring their ‘stuff’ in all the time, creating a more regular lack of focus,” he says. And when personal details are shared, there is a risk of creating cliques: those”in the know” and those feeling left out, which can be demoralizing and hurt your team, he says. You want to be careful about not leaving the impression that you’re not focused and committed. 

5. Too much about anything

Whether it’s positive or negative news, no one wants to hear a coworker talk endlessly about anything. Your children, latest obsession, hobby, home life, or other topics can get old fast, so be mindful of how often you’re revisiting them, Glickman says. If someone inquires, give a broad answer and offer to discuss it more at a later time, to not hold up the rest of the team.

More must-read stories from Fortune:

—How this daughter of immigrant farmers found her comms job at Tyson
—How an entry-level UX designer at Amazon got her foot in the door
—How this Harvard grad found a job in the natural cheese business at Kraft Heinz
—How this former Army sergeant found an entry-level job at IBM
—A look inside GM’s two-year, entry-level rotational program
Get Fortune’s RaceAhead newsletter for sharp insights on corporate culture and diversity.



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North Macedonian PM urges snap election after EU declines to launch accession talks By Reuters




SKOPJE (Reuters) – North Macedonia’s Prime Minister Zoran Zaev called on Saturday for a snap parliamentary election after the European Union failed to give his country a date to start talks on joining the bloc.

French President Emmanuel Macron on Friday led a group of leaders who blocked opening talks with Albania and North Macedonia, despite concerns over increasing Chinese and Russian influence in the Balkans.

“I’m disappointed and angry and I know our people feel the same,” Zaev told a news conference, calling the decision not to open entry talks a “historic mistake”.

“There is no time to lose and that is why my suggestion is to organize fast early parliamentary elections. We need your (citizens’) view,” Zaev said.

Parliament has to approve any snap election, but Zaev’s center-left coalition has a majority and the opposition also backs an early poll. Zaev said party leaders would discuss the issue on Sunday evening with President Stevo Pendarovski.

After Skopje agreed to end a dispute with Greece over the country’s name – changing it to North Macedonia from Macedonia – the former Yugoslav republic had expected to be granted a date to start entry talks with the EU.

“A great injustice was inflicted on us. The EU did not deliver on its promise,” Zaev said. “We discharged all our obligations, we delivered results in our reforms, we solved the issues with our neighbors.”

The West has long seen the integration of the western Balkan states into NATO and the EU as a way to stabilize the region following the ethnic wars of the 1990s that destroyed the old Yugoslavia.

As well as North Macedonia and Albania, four other countries – Bosnia, Kosovo, Montenegro and Serbia – also aspire to join the EU, but the enlargement process has largely stalled amid increased public concerns in western Europe about immigration and the strains of dealing with Britain’s exit from the bloc.

North Macedonia is expected to become the 30th member of NATO later this year or early in 2020, once its accession has been ratified by all member states of the U.S.-led alliance.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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China to further reduce tariffs and remove non-tariff barriers for foreign investors: Xinhua By Reuters




SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Chinese Vice Premier Han Zheng vowed to further reduce tariffs and remove non-tariff barriers for global investors, official Xinhua News Agency reported on Saturday.

Han welcomed multinational companies to invest more in China, saying the country will only open its door wider and wider, according to Xinhua.

Han made the remarks at a summit for multinational companies in China’s eastern city of Qingdao, Xinhua said.

In a separate event on Saturday, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said China will work with the United States to address each other’s core concerns on the basis of equality and mutual respect, and that stopping the trade war would be good for both sides and the world.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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U.S. oil major Chevron says hopeful about maintaining Venezuela presence By Reuters



© Reuters. The logo of Chevron is seen at the company’s office in Caracas

By Kanishka Singh

(Reuters) – U.S. oil major Chevron Corp (N:) said late on Friday it is optimistic about maintaining a presence in Venezuela even amid U.S. sanctions on the country and state oil company PDVSA as part of Washington’s effort to oust President Nicolas Maduro.

The company’s remarks follow an earlier report by Bloomberg that said the United States is considering extending Chevron’s waiver to operate in Venezuela with more limitations by granting the company a 90-day sanctions reprieve.

“We are a positive presence in Venezuela, and we are hopeful that General License 8C is renewed so that we can continue operations in the country for the long-term,” Ray Fohr, a Chevron spokesman, told Reuters in an emailed statement.

“We have dedicated investments and a large workforce who are dependent on our presence.”

“General License No 8C” is the license that authorizes transactions in Venezuela involving PDVSA and entities it owns, according to the website of the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Chevron’s future in Venezuela now depends on U.S. President Donald Trump, who must decide by Oct. 25 whether to renew the waiver allowing the company to keep operating in Venezuela despite U.S. sanctions.

The Treasury Department aims to further limit Venezuela’s crude production and is concerned that Chevron’s joint venture projects in Venezuela are providing financing to help Maduro’s socialist government pay back its debt to Russian oil company Rosneft PJSC, Bloomberg reported on Friday. This could encourage more loans in the future.

The report added, however, that the United States also wants to maintain a presence in Venezuela’s oil industry in case of a political transition.

Chevron has been present in Venezuela for nearly 100 years. It opened its Caracas office in 1923, and first struck oil at the Boscan field in 1946.

The Trump administration has several times imposed sanctions on Venezuela and sought to limit PDVSA’s transactions to largely cut off Maduro’s access to oil revenues, which account for most of the South American country’s hard currency income.

The Treasury Department did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment late on Friday.

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